Posts Tagged With: mythology

A Monster Calls

by Patrick Ness, based on an idea by Siobhan Dowd, ill. Jim Kay

Late at night, Conor wakes from a nightmare to hear someone calling his name. No, not someone: something. The yew tree from the neighbouring graveyard has transported itself into his yard, twisting its branches into a monstrous shape with arms, legs, and a face. Having been woken by a nightmare more horrifying than a monstrous yew tree, Conor isn’t afraid. He thinks it’s just another dream. But when he wakes up in the morning, the floor of his room is covered in yew leaves. Conor has more going on than midnight visits from a monster–in the waking world, his mother is struggling with cancer and everyone at school is treating him like some innocent victim. The yew tree continues to visit Conor and tell him stories about other times he has been called to enact justice, and Conor starts to hope that the yew tree can help him fix his life. But the monster’s ideas about justice are quite different from Conor’s.

I found this book hard to get into at first, even though the illustrations are really dark and beautiful. I was expecting a straight-up monster story, and the first few pages describe a visit from a monster but it’s not scary. Conor isn’t even afraid, so how was I supposed to be? Then I got to the part about Conor cleaning the house and fixing his own breakfast because his mom is still in bed. I thought it was the typical neglectful parent you find in most horror stories. Once I picked up on the clues that Conor’s mom had cancer, the story shifted for me. Usually kids’ stories about cancer or other illnesses are too after-school special for me to enjoy, with more predictable trajectories than monster stories, but this one is different. This one overlaps the horror element of monster stories with the real life struggles of a child whose parent has cancer. The story is beautifully told, and portrays Conor as he would like to be seen–a flawed hero in a horror story of epic proportions, not the victimized subject of an uncomfortable “issues” book taught in school. Both genres are enriched by this story’s inclusion of the other: the horror aspects of the story embody the dark issues of Conor’s situation, making it easier to empathize with him than if he was merely telling readers about how scared he is about his mom; conversely, the mundane and realistic possibility of Conor losing his mother to cancer makes the horror story more threatening than it would be if simply the fate of the world hung in the balance. While it took me eight or so goes to get to page 20, I found Conor’s complicated dilemma absolutely compelling and read the rest of the book straight through. It is an original, beautiful read with excellent illustrations that bring out both the horror and the sadness of the story.

Recommended for older kids and younger teens who can handle dark books about horror and death. Older teens looking for fanged monsters and blood will be disappointed, but those looking for a sad story will still enjoy it even if they do not care for supernatural horror.

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The Night Tourist

by Katherine Marsh

In the New York underworld live all the ghosts of those who have died in NYC. At least, they’re still there until they resolve all their issues and move on. Jack has not moved on. In fact, Jack didn’t even die when he got hit by that car. Even though he’s not dead, he can see dead people. That’s how he meets Euri, a ghost girl about his age who leads him to the underworld. He enlists her help to find his mother, who died in New York years ago. The living are not welcome in the underworld, though, so Jack and Euri must conduct their search while being hunted by a three-headed hellhound who wants to tear Jack to pieces. On top of all of this, Jack can only stay in the underworld for three days before he loses the ability to return to the land of the living.

This book is full of mysteries, like, Just who is this Euri? Why is she helping Jack? Why does Jack share some abilities with dead people? Did he really die in that accident? And why don’t the dates on his mother’s death records match up?

This is a cool mystery for kids who are into Greek mythology. It has a balanced amount of suspense, action, and character development, and is also obviously written by somebody who knows their stuff. A good one for older kids suffering Percy Jackson withdrawal.

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